Curriculum


The honors program offers a 48-credit alternative general education curriculum, which allows students to pursue any major or program of study offered at the college.




Each fall or spring semester course is inter-disciplinary in nature and is worth 4 credits. The academic content of each course is worth 3 credits, but each course will also require 1 credit of research with a faculty member or service. The January term courses are worth 3 credits and do not include outside research or service requirements.

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In addition to these courses, students enrolled in the honors program are required to complete:

  • One biblical theology course (300 level) and one doctrine course (400 level).
  • A foreign study component worth 12 credits; alternatively, they may complete 12 foreign language credits (at the 200 level and above) on campus.
  • A placement text to demonstrate a math competency equal to one semester of calculus or pass MAT 221 Calculus 1.
  • One lab science course (this may be fulfilled with a traditional lab science course or a J-term honors course that requires a significant lab/empirical component).
  • A capstone experience/project that the students prepare during their fourth year. The senior project must be coordinated with the major advisor and synthesize knowledge and skills from both the honors program and academic major or professional program.
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Students enrolled in the honors program will participate in the following courses:

HON 101 The Ancient World. 4 cr.
A study of the origins of late Western European culture through the institutions, art, religion, and thought of ancient Israel, Greece, and Rome. Prereq: instructor consent.
HON 103 The Middle Ages. 4 cr.
A study of the development of political, social and intellectual life in medieval Europe as it grows by assimilating and contrasting itself with ancient culture. Prereq: instructor consent.
HON 201 Renaissance and Reformation. 4 cr.
An exploration of re-ordering of the medieval world and the Christian church, as well as the establishing of a new modern world, through works of art, political philosophy, literature, and theology. Prereq: instructor consent.
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HON 203 Reason and Revolution. 4 cr.
An exploration of re-ordering of the medieval world and the Christian church, as well as the establishing of a new modern world, through works of art, political philosophy, literature, and theology. Prereq: instructor consent.
HON 301 Foreign Study. 12 cr.
A semester spent studying abroad in an accredited program. Requires approval of honors program director. Alternatively, may be satisfied with four foreign language courses above the 200 level. Prereq: instructor consent.
HON 401 Capstone Project. 4 cr.
Senior thesis development. Supervised research or creative project designed to demonstrate the intersection of students’ education in the honors program and their majors. Public presentation of work at end of the term. Prereq: instructor consent.
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HON 491 Special Topics. 3 cr.
In-depth exploration of texts, ideas, and issues in a particular academic discipline. Topics may include exploration in the works of a single author, analysis of a particular movement or time period, or new theoretical approaches to an intellectual issue. Course will be repeated at least twice under different titles and topics. Prereq: instructor consent.
HON 403 The Contemporary World. 4 cr.
An analysis of cultural directions in current times. Course includes readings of contemporary criticism and theories, discussions, presentations, written responses, and various gallery experiences. Prereq: instructor consent.

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Students in the honors program?

Students in the honors program will take one class each semester during Years 1, 2, and 4. During Year 3, they may use either semester to study abroad and use the other semester for researching their capstone project. If students select to pursue the 12 foreign language credits, they may take those classes at any time they are enrolled in the college. Students will take at least two special topics classes in the program during the January term, but they should consider the benefits of taking three or more of the special topics classes.

Click this link to see a sample four-year plan for the program: link